In Good Conscience, I Can No Longer Support Marty Walsh as Mayor of Boston

Nick_Marty

Mayor Marty Walsh (left) and the author

consider myself a decent judge of character.

For better or for worse, I’m often able to discern what certain people’s strengths and weaknesses are, how to read their expressions and body language, why they act certain ways in certain situations, and even sometimes their thought process in particular scenarios.

In 2013 I employed this capability to the race to succeed Mayor Tom Menino who had announced in March of that year that he would not seek to prolong his tenure as the longest serving mayor in the history of Boston. Leveraging my then-embryonic role as a news writer covering my first election of any kind, I was able to compile an informative foundation upon which I built my unprejudiced rationale for my candidate of choice.

I’ll freely admit that I cast my ballot for the incumbent Mayor of Boston, Marty Walsh.

One week removed from the 2016 Massachusetts primary, I regret it wholeheartedly.

Since his inauguration in 2014, Mayor Walsh’s administration has been a torrent of ill-fated actions all too frequently encroaching, if not bypassing, the line of unlawful.

At first it was tolerable, little more than the growing pains of a former state legislator now taking the executive reins of a national metropolitan power.

But his latest misstep, parading around in cahoots with former President Bill Clinton to support former Secretary of State and Senator Hillary Clinton as the Democratic nominee for President, has left a bitter taste in my mouth that, at a moral level, will prohibit me from supporting Marty for any office at any level.

At the time this was written 99% of Massachusetts precincts reported their primary results, tipping the candidate scale in Hillary’s favor over Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders by a painfully narrow 50% to 49%.

Had Hillary dominated Bernie like Michael Phelps dominated swimming in Beijing in 2008, I would gladly keep my thoughts to myself and maybe even applaud her for a performance well done. But because her edge was so slim, because there was even the slightest semblance of controversy, because I champion a system of democracy, something must be done here.

As mayor, Marty Walsh stands at the vanguard of municipal policy and accountability. As mayor of the largest city in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the state’s socioeconomic driver, Marty stands in the shadow of only the governor in this same regard.

For that reason, Marty should be held responsible for when, according to the New York Times, “Mr. Clinton stopped at a bake sale at the entrance and then shook hands with poll workers.”

Massachusetts Secretary Bill Galvin told the Times, “We had to remind some of our poll workers that even a president can’t go inside and work a polling place.”

I don’t think it’s inconceivable that the tag team of Marty and Bill schmoozing the inside of a West Roxbury polling station may have helped nudge Hillary to victory. That Bill went on to work more Bay State crowds in the likes of Newton and New Bedford only bolsters that notion.

After all Boston is, to borrow an obnoxious though befitting cliche from the local startup community, an “influencer.”

Massachusetts law blatantly states “Within 150 feet of a polling place…no person shall solicit votes for or against, or otherwise promote or oppose, any person or political party or position on a ballot question, to be voted on at the current election.”

This is exactly what Bill’s presence and accompanying message constituted. And lest we forget, Marty previously served as a state Representative — a sentinel of this law.

Together, Bill and Marty executed a sleazy maneuver that would bring tears of joy to the eye of Ted Cruz and make his chest swell with political pride.

But because Hillary’s triumph was razor thin, and the only foul stench seemed to stem from Marty and Bill, I can’t help but wonder what the results would’ve been if the tandem hadn’t broken the rules. Would Bernie have won? I’m not suggesting any kind of recount or consolation in Bernie’s favor, but I demand an equal playing field for all candidates.

Somehow, someway something must be done to fade this stain on #mapoli.

In the meantime, here’s hoping this proves to be the final shovelful of dirt cast on the political grave of Marty Walsh. He’s stockpiled an arsenal of dubious motives and moves that prove to me that his Boston thermometer reads the warmest when something’s in his favor.

I’ll happily elaborate.

Frequently since he was sworn into office, Marty’s been too cavalier with initiatives that, when overlooked, have the ability to strike a fatal blow to Boston residents.

Marty brought Everett’s Wynn casino ordeal to Boston’s backyard when he “lost his grip on the process, failing to sign a surrounding-community agreement with Wynn and refusing to engage in arbitration,” according to the Boston Globe.

The same Globe piece notes further that “Walsh quickly evacuated more than 350 homeless men and women,” from the homeless shelter on Boston Harbor’s Long Island “but he deliberated for weeks while trying to find a site for a new shelter, settling first on a vacant plot of city-owned land along the Southeast Expressway, only to switch suddenly to a different site in the Newmarket district.”

That was just his first year.

For Marty, 2015 was marred by the Boston 2024 Olympic bid which unleashed a deluge requests for public records and information in hopes of shedding light on backroom deals that led to Boston being tapped as the U.S. host city contender.

As was the case with Wynn, Marty initially opposed a referendum and subjected his administration to a contract which strictly forbade any bad-mouthing about the bid in general.

Residents of Boston railed against Marty and his Boston 2024 establishment, comprised of developers, moguls, politicians and financiers, and continuously asked for concrete evidence that taxpayers would not be responsible for Olympic cost overruns, infrastructure shortcomings and the pricing out of residents as a byproduct of Olympics development.

Olympics advocates systematically eked out more iotas of information and redacted documents but when it became apparent that they’d continue to harbor the consequential details, and subsequently when the United States Olympic Committee prepared to rescind its support for Boston in favor of a city whose climate was more favorable towards the shadiness of Olympic dealings, Marty held a press conference to preemptively wash his hands of the entire prospect under the guise that public opinion was his heartfelt priority.

This year began with a whimper for Marty as it became clear for many local parents and children that the Boston Public Schools system is woefully inadequate. Protesters gathered at his 2016 State of the City Address, at City Hall in February and, most recently, staged a 1,000-plus person walk out on March 7 to demonstrate against a $50 million budget deficit for Boston Public Schools. The dire budgetary circumstances mean reduced staff, reduced resources and reduced possibilities for students moving forward.

All the while, Marty’s team has failed to gain any traction lobbying Beacon Hill for improved late night hospitality services (extended operation hours, liquor license reform, laxer live entertainment regulations, etc.).

He’s further proven himself backward-minded when it comes to medicinal and recreational marijuana, which is proven to combat opioid and alcohol dependency– a fact that seems lost on Marty, whose 20-plus years on the wagon might’ve opened his eyes to progressive ways to treat rampant addiction. Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren, though, is thankfully moving that needle in Congress on our collective behalf.

And, most detrimental of all, Marty has failed to curtail the housing crises which has eaten away at the city like gangrene. Since taking office, housing prices have risen meteorically and despite soliciting ideas from the public, from higher-educational institutions and from constituent politicos, Walsh has been unable to lend a hand to stopping this cost hemorrhage.

Under Walsh’s Boston Redevelopment Authority, innumerable luxury apartments and condos have sprang up in and around Downtown Boston while cost relief has been strikingly absent in the city’s outer, residential neighborhoods. Like how NASA physicists were able to record a ripple in space-time, so too is a ripple of unaffordability oscillating out from the center of Boston.

To his credit Marty did sign an executive order back in December but it doesn’t go nearly far enough. In essence, the order only really bolsters two aspects of the Inclusionary Development Policy:

First, developers who won’t include the required 13 percent of units in an on-site development as affordable have the option to build them off-site, though that number spikes gently to 18 percent in neighborhoods downtown, on the waterfront (Zone A) and Allston, Brighton, Charlestown, Jamaica Plain, Mission Hill, and part of South Boston (Zone B). In Dorchester, East Boston, Hyde Park, Mattapan, Roslindale, Roxbury, and West Roxbury (Zone C), affordable units built off-site must constitute 15 percent of all units.

Second, developers can donate a minimum of $200,000 to the Inclusionary Development Fund per housing unit. This jumps to $380,000 in Zone A and $300,000 in Zone B.

Translation: Developers who don’t want to build affordable housing units on-site have to build a slightly increased number of affordable units off-site, or they can simply throw a hefty lump sum at the City as a placating alternative.

It’s a bandage for a bullet wound, designed to keep luxury developers interested in breaking ground in Boston but not to deter them from building more for the under-resourced.

This is not to say Marty’s achieved nothing of merit.

He’s advocated strongly for Boston’s public art, taken steps to reinforce the startup community, christened the new Bolling Building in Dudley Square, pushed for an encompassing Master Plan

50-years in the making, open-sourced public data, taken steps to revitalize City Hall Plaza, made City Hall gender-neutral, charted a roadmap for women and minority business owners, streamlined licensing and permitting, and strongly supported crowdsourcing ideas from Boston’s collective brainpower.

In January 2015, I even wrote favorably of Walsh and his vision.

These wins, though, pale in comparison to the losses. They’re dwarfed by gaffes which are more overarching than his small-time, street-level gains.

How many times must he bumble stubbornly and tone-deaf into an issue (à la Wynn, Boston 2024, affordable housing, Bill Clinton, etc.), only to realize that he’s either not read the fine print, or that it’s directly problematic for residents, or that it’s generally not in the best interest of the city at present and in the future, or that he flirts with unlawfulness, before we stop cutting him breaks?

Marty’s a seasoned politician who should by now be able to accurately feel the pulse of Boston, but that pulse grows fainter under his tutelage.

In the next mayoral election, we must all consider that Marty does more damage to Boston than good despite his best intentions.

You had your chance, Marty. Not only are you continually in the wrong, but it doesn’t seem you’re learning from your mistakes.

I am absolutely willing to support a leader who may encounter a few speed bumps. But I also want a leader who will face these shortcomings head on, learn from them, adapt with them, and apply them and their solutions to issues he or she may face imminently thereafter.

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8 thoughts on “In Good Conscience, I Can No Longer Support Marty Walsh as Mayor of Boston

  1. Very well said! A lot of truth in here-and a lot more still needs to become apparent to the citizens of Boston. You don’t necessarily have to live in the city to feel the Mayor’s grasp. Half the pick-up trucks in surrounding areas still bare his campaign bumper stickers, because after all, Massachusetts his home to some of the most loyal (and most likely brainwashed) union branches in the country. But why? People say America is the land of opportunity–that every person has a voice. But how does that happen when ENTIRE unions collectively vote for one candidate? I have nothing against unions: in fact, I have (and had) many family members who lived by the union and died by the union. But like anything, a few bad apples can ruin it all. I hope the teacher’s union pull their support for him.

    I’ve met Marty a few times and he seems like a decent guy, but I don’t think anyone wants Boston to become Los Angeles or New York. And that’s what he’s trying to do. We don’t want the Olympics: We don’t want IndyCar. We don’t need a Ferris wheel to spruce up the appeal of City Hall. It is a dump and for good reason: it symbolizes strength and humility; it symbolizes a home to the stewards of public service. The only sprucing needed done is within his office and the people he surrounds himself with. A Ferris wheel is actually quite symbolic for him: because right now, like the carnival he wants surrounding his building, his leadership lately is nothing more profound than a clown. Boston is great because of the people: not the people he appoints and not the people who are forced to feign on everything he says (check Twitter: you can always tell who works for him). But the people who like who they are and what their environment has made them.

    This was a bit of a tangent, so my apologies for that. Great article though. I hope it gets the recognition it deserves.

    Like

  2. Very well said! A lot of truth in here-and a lot more still needs to become apparent to the citizens of Boston. You don’t necessarily have to live in the city to feel the Mayor’s grasp. Half the pick-up trucks in surrounding areas still bare his campaign bumper stickers, because after all, Massachusetts his home to some of the most loyal (and most likely brainwashed) union branches in the country. But why? People say America is the land of opportunity–that every person has a voice. But how does that happen when ENTIRE unions collectively vote for one candidate? I have nothing against unions: in fact, I have (and had) many family members who lived by the union and died by the union. But like anything, a few bad apples can ruin it all. I hope the teacher’s union pull their support for him.

    I’ve met Marty a few times and he seems like a decent guy, but I don’t think anyone wants Boston to become Los Angeles or New York. And that’s what he’s trying to do. We don’t want the Olympics: We don’t want IndyCar. We don’t need a Ferris wheel to spruce up the appeal of City Hall. It is a dump and for good reason: it symbolizes strength and humility; it symbolizes a home to the stewards of public service. The only sprucing needed done is within his office and the people he surrounds himself with. A Ferris wheel is actually quite symbolic for him: because right now, like the carnival he wants surrounding his building, his leadership lately is nothing more profound than a clown. Boston is great because of the people: not the people he appoints and not the people who are forced to feign on everything he says (check Twitter: you can always tell who works for him). But the people who like who they are and what their environment has made them.

    This was a bit of a tangent, so my apologies for that. Great article though. I hope it gets the recognition it deserves.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. This doesn’t make sense.,,these projects are years in the making and have nothing to do with Mayor Walsh’s decisions.

    “Under Walsh’s Boston Redevelopment Authority, innumerable luxury apartments and condos have sprang up in and around Downtown Boston while cost relief has been strikingly absent in the city’s outer, residential neighborhoods. Like how NASA physicists were able to record a ripple in space-time, so too is a ripple of unaffordability oscillating out from the center of Boston”

    Like

  4. Marty does not care about residents and caters to businesses.

    Most people work during the day so you miss how the city targets residents and give businesses free pass (including those outside of the city).

    Goto any downtown neighborhood during the day and look at the commercial vehicles that are illegally parked (and often endangering public safety- how are emergency vehicles going to get by). BTD will walk right past them (upon talking to someone at enforcement, they said that the drivers can move the vehicle incase of an emergency) or at best wait to try and find the driver, yet if you forget to move your car for street cleaning, you’re tagged the second they can get to you.

    Last year I watched enforcement do everything they could to find the owner of a plumbers truck before ticketing it while a resident was tagged immediately and then towed. The resident’s vehicle was long before enforcement finally ticketed (but did not tow) the non resident plumber.

    Willfully illegally parked commercial vehicles that endanger residents get free passes, but if a resident makes a mistake they get no mercy.

    It gets better… Try and get Btd to do their job and they threaten you with boston police detectives “paying you a visit”

    We need a mayor who will fight for residents while keeping the city business friendly.

    And one of the responses correctly points out that these projects have been around for years and were greenlighted enmass by menino in his last month’s. I was looking at the Avalon project next to north station back in 2005 when I was working for a construction company.

    Like

  5. I’m gonna vote for Marty in 2017 because I think he’s doing a good job creating jobs for Boston. The economy is really thriving.
    The olympics thing wasn’t great but he played it smart – wait and see. It could have been a good opportunity, but when it turned out it wasn’t, Marty cut it off at exactly the right time. That’s what I like about him, he’s a risk taker, and my uncle Joe always told me, No Risk, No Reward.

    Entertaining piece Nick. You’re a great writer. Not sure I agree with everything you said, but you sure give me plenty to think about. Thanks!

    Like

    • Here is a portion of an e-mall I received from Btd. the mayor’s office is well aware that Btd is targeting residents while giving commercial vehicles free pass that are endangering public safety and making a mockery of their 311 system.

      “I’m not going to entertain your complaints anymore. Our officers ticket all vehicles in violation. We would rather get someone to move than issue a ticket. Here is the phone # to detective Gambon you can call him an discuss it with him. His number is . Goodbye now”

      2 things:
      1) Btd job is to entrain complaints? I thought it was to enforce parking regulations (among other things)

      2) apparently this person is too dumb to realize they contradicted themselves in a 5 line e-mail and admits that they give commercial vehicles free passes (in this case a tractor trailer was parked in the middle of Hanover st in a crosswalk).

      Like

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